managing my mental health

Life is full of ups, downs and in betweens. Some days are full of laughs and some are tear-filled. Emotions are interesting- we can’t always figure them out, but yet they don’t go away. There are times that we feel that our emotions are out of control and that can be a scary feeling. It takes a bit of time and work to get them manageable again.

Why Should I Manage My Mental Health?

Mental and physical health are connected- if you’re depressed and don’t want to get out of bed, this can negatively impact your daily life. You might not make it to work, get your child from school, even take a shower. After a few days in bed, these things and more can really pile up. Depression can wear down your body, making you feel fatigued, lose your appetite (or the opposite), lose motivation, and other negative effects. If you’re constantly anxious, this can lead to a rapid heartbeat, muscle tension, stomach issues, and more.

When you are having issues with your mental health, you may feel as if your head is “in the clouds”, a sort of mental fog. It may be hard to concentrate on your job, schoolwork, chores, or even things that you enjoy. It also may be hard to remember things. You may even miss out on social and family events due to these issues.

It’s hard to go through life feeling this way- unsettled, unhappy and possibly not knowing why. It may be time to find ways to make life a bit less complicated. You’re worth it. It’s okay to seek help and get what you need, whether that is therapy, medications or both.

It’s hard to go through life feeling this way- unsettled, unhappy and possibly not knowing why.

Leaving mental health issues untreated can lead to worsening symptoms, including substance/drug abuse, aggressiveness, suicidal thoughts/attempts, and other serious complications.

The Next Steps

Finding a provider can start with an online search or with your Primary Care Physician (PCP) . Either way, set up an appointment with a psychiatric provider for an intake appointment if you feel that is what you need. Some PCPs will prescribe antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications and refer to a therapist. This depends on your needs and the PCP’s opinion.

If you are uninsured, there are local clinics in most areas that operate on sliding scales. There are also websites that may be helpful, or even apps on almost every network store (Google Play, Apple Store, etc) that can be used for therapy, like Seven Cups. These apps have licensed therapists to help you.

If you are prescribed medications, please take them as directed. If you begin to have uncomfortable side effects, call the prescribing physician and let them know. Don’t stop taking them on your own- some medications have withdrawal effects that can be worse than the side effects that you’re facing. If you start to feel better, please continue taking your medication.

Take care of yourself physically. This can go a long way in feeling good about yourself- you can do small things daily, like taking a walk, yoga, jump rope, whatever gets you moving. Eating well and drinking lots of water can help.

It is possible to live a full life with mental health issues. There will be hard days, but if you take care of yourself, physically and mentally, there aren’t many things you can’t tackle.

Wrae Sanders

Wrae is a parenting/mental health blogger in Louisville, KY. She has a BA in Clinical Psychology and a decade in mental health work experience. Wrae has worked with bloggers such as Brynn of “The Mama on the Rocks", the sisters behind Life Is Worth Living” and has been published on Mental Health Talk.

When she is not writing, she enjoys reading, true crime podcasts, and movies. She is married and has three children.

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